Athletic Recruiting Recruiting is Like..

What The Recruiting Process Is Like: Preparing for Your Breakout Role in a Blockbuster

football player lifted into the air by a teammate while vying for a college football scholarship

Along with millions of other movie-goers, I went and saw Jurassic World open over the weekend.

Being a product of the ’90s, I grew up watching Jurassic Park and its sequels and have been 100 percent enthralled with the previews and Chris Pratt interviews leading up to the newest installment.

And in just three days it became the highest global opening of all time, bringing in $511.8 million in its first weekend on the market.

I’d say they crushed it.

Obviously, a lot of time and energy goes into creating a blockbuster hit. Months go into casting. Even more time taken for shooting. Scenes are timed and planned meticulously. All with the hopes that everything put in is peanuts next to the reward.

That sounds familiar to me.

It’s just what the recruiting process is like.

No, seriously.

The recruiting process is a lot like preparing for the breakout role of your life.

Think about it from the point of view of the director. I mean coach. All college coaches will spend countless hours casting.

For the good of the current team, for success in years to come, in part because their own livelihood and job security depends on it, coaches put many eggs in their recruiting baskets.

What does it take to cast the right student-athlete for the role?

It takes watching audition tape after audition tape (aka: highlight video after highlight video). It takes many hours on the road. It takes scouring — and I mean scouring — social media for any red flags concerning a potential leading role or supporting part. It takes networks like NCSA Athletic Recruiting with a trusted database for students who may fit the bill.

The right cast can be the difference between a blockbuster hit or total bust.

You have to make the most of your audition and your call backs.

It’s up to you to be looking for the roles — the roster openings and programs — that fit you best and are most qualified for, and to give each and every opportunity all you’ve got. It takes a lot of time and patience, hard work, rehearsing and practicing, practicing and rehearsing. It takes a lot of sacrifice.

Have you researched the part?

There are literally hundreds of programs where you could play your sport. Why are you interested in this school’s? This isn’t just rhetorical; you better believe a college coach is going to ask it of you.

Are you studying your lines?

Or just studying? Remember, there’s a minimum GPA that every student-athlete must maintain to be considered for a college roster spot. And while there is a sliding scale between your GPA and your SAT/ACT score, the higher both are, the more impressive a candidate you’ll be.

Do you have the charisma of a leading actor?

You might not have to walk the red carpet, but in addition to communicating with college coaches, being a part of a college team will be a whole new experience, especially if you’re from a small town where you’re the break out star. You’ll be contributing to a team where everyone was a gifted athlete — and that’s how they’ve become a college student-athlete. Will you be a team player?

It takes a lot of dreaming big while remaining realistic with your eye on the prize: the breakout role of your life on the right college spot for you.

And then, it’s show time.

Know your role and give life to the script in front of you. Take your team to blockbuster status. Strive for the highest global opening of all time – on the court, in the classroom, as a role model and contributing member of society.

If you need help getting there, our scouts can talk to you about your recruiting. The best way to get started is with a recruiting profile.

About the author
Laura Chmiel

Laura Chmiel is a marketing coordinator and a lead writer for NCSA Athletic Recruiting. As someone with a passion for athletics and education, she graduated from Indiana university with a B.S. in Elementary Education. After school, she gained first-hand experience helping student-athletes and their families get to college.